The artwork’s field of faceted reflections defines the buildings vertical circulation experience.

Images

THE FIELD OF HEXAGONAL REFLECTORS ARE ACTIVATED BY DAYLIGHT FROM THE SKYLIGHT ABOVE THE 100' ATRIUM

THE ATRIUM ARTWORK BUILDS UPON THE BUILDING'S CORE CONCERN WITH DAYLIGHTING

NINE MIRRORS BELOW THE SKYLIGHT ARE ARRANGED TO DIRECT LIGHT TO THE LOBBY LEVEL THROUGHOUT THE YEAR

LOOKING DOWN THE SUSPENDED LIGHT PILLARS OCCUPYING THE NARROW ATRIUM

VIEW FROM THE LOBBY AT THE ELEVATOR BANK WHERE THE NARROW ATTRIUM RISES 100'

THE FACETS OF EACH PILLAR VARY IN LIMITED RANGE OF COLORS AND REFLECTIVITY

DEPENDING ON THE VIEWER’S POSITION THE ARTWORK FLUCTUATES FROM STATIC ARRAYS TO HIGHLY DYNAMIC FIELDS

JCDA ALSO WORKED WITHT THE ARCHITECT ON THE BUILDING ENCLOSURE, FURTHER ARTICULATING THE ARCHITECT'S LIGHT-DRIVEN SCHEME

Description

Commissioned by Art in Architecture Program of the U.S. General Services Administration, this sculpture occupies the entire height of sky-lit atrium at the elevator core and consists of optical aluminum, machined aluminum and stainless steel rods.

JCDA’s artwork is conceived as a suspended grid of vertically suspended hexagonal “pillars”, designed to suggest and mimic a cloud composed of ice crystals. Such ice clouds are common phenomena in the Salt Lake City area and occur when cold air and water in the upper atmosphere combine to create suspended ice crystals that often take the form of polygonal “pillars”. When aligned and then intersected by a beam of sunlight, these hexagons refract the light and create a range of atmospheric light effects such as halos and pillars.

The art work’s 9 stacked fields of hexagonal tubes are, like the cloud borne ice crystals that inspire them, suspended and aligned. They are also intersected by beams of sunlight, projected into their midst by nine tilted mirrors below the skylight. Using reflection to emulate the refraction that occurs in clouds, the Suspended Light Pillars serve to evoke one of Salt Lake City’s signature visual phenomena.

Architect: Thomas Phifer & Partners
Daylighting: Carpenter Norris Consulting