Our all-glass buildings are each conceived as a light instrument deeply connecting visitors to their sequential passage through the museum campus.

Images

VIEW ALONG ROUTE OF PASSAGE TOWARD THE GALLERY ENTRANCE PAVILION

ROUTE OF PASSAGE AT CENTER COURTYARD CONNECTING TO CARTER PROMENADE

VIEW FROM THE CARTER PROMENADE OF THE GALLERY ENTRANCE PAVILION AND WATER FEATURE ILLUMINATED BY THE ROUTE OF PASSAGE BELOW

VIEW OF WATER FEATURE ALONG CARTER PROMENADE AT NIGHT

AERIAL VIEW AND DIAGRAMATIC OUTLINE OF THE MUSEUM RENEWAL
 

VIEW OF THE CARTER PROMENADE AND GALLERY ENTRANCE PAVILION

ENTRY PAVILION SEQUENCE
 

ENTRY TO ROUTE OF PASSAGE

VIEW OF GALLERY ENTRANCE PAVILION ENTRY INTO ROUTE OF PASSAGE

Description

JCDA’s vision for the five-year expansion and renewal of the Israel Museum’s 20-acre campus was to reorganize the campus plan and poetically moderate Jerusalem’s intense natural light within new, innovative all-glass pavilions. A sequential and engaging experience of subtle light effects provides intuitive wayfinding, enhancing the visitor experience of the Museum’s art, architecture, and surrounding landscape.

The Israel Museum’s campus enhancement project was designed to resonate with the original design vision of Alfred Mansfeld and Dora Gad, infusing light and a clarity of circulation into a built environment that had changed tremendously since its opening in 1965. JCDA designed 95,000 square feet of new construction, including three Entrance Pavilions standing at the front of the campus housing ticketing, restaurant, and retail, a main Gallery Entrance Pavilion providing centralized access to the Museum’s main galleries, and a major below-ground Route of Passage that connects the two parts of the campus.

The structure and form of the four new glass pavilions, created to support visitor circulation, echo the modernist geometry of the Museum’s original buildings. At the same time, the pavilions provide a visual counterpoint to the stone-clad facades of the original buildings, which present the Museum’s collection and exhibitions. Each glass pavilion is enclosed by terracotta light-redirecting louvers designed to transmit a sense of the exterior landscape into the buildings while entirely blocking the transmission of direct light.

Captured on the interior plane of the louvers, a continuous play of light, shadow, and color is broadcast by the louver geometry. As visitors transition through the Entrance Pavilions at the front of the campus, they may reach the galleries either by ascending the Museum’s refurbished Carter Promenade or by entering the new Route of Passage, situated directly below the promenade. Leading visitors to the heart of the Museum, this below-ground transition is designed as a luminous and active visitor experience. The route is flanked on one side by a light slot revealed behind a continuous translucent glass wall. Enclosing the light slot above is a prismatic cast glass water-feature running along the Carter Promenade’s walkway. Water-activated light projected into the light-slot is distilled by the 426 foot long translucent glass wall into a mutable expression of the sky sweeping across the campus. The sound of the bubbling water combined with the performative effects of the light create both a visual and aural connection between the below-ground Route of Passage and the exterior landscape of the Museum.

The Route of Passage brings visitors into the lowest level of the Gallery Entrance Pavilion. The Gallery Entrance Pavilion provides vertical circulation to the Museum’s three collection wings and temporary exhibition galleries on its main floor, while also allowing visitors to reach Crown Plaza at the campus’ highest point.


 

Client: Israel Museum, Jerusalem
Architect: A. Lerman Architects
Engineer: J Kahan & Partners
Daylighting: Carpenter Norris Consulting